RNP, TI-Rwanda launch ‘citizen service charter’

0
Inspector General of Police (IGP) Emmanuel K. Gasana, Marie-Immaculee Ingabire, the Chairperson of Transparency International Rwanda Chapter, Stephen Rwamulangwa, Mayor of Gasabo during the ‘citizen service charter’ launch.

Rwanda National Police (RNP) in Partnership with Transparency International-Rwanda Chapter, have launched the ‘Citizen Service Charter’ that illustrates the rights of those seeking police services, and obligations of officers to service seekers.

Speaking at the official launch held at Kigali Metropolitan Police Headquarters, yesterday, the Inspector General of Police (IGP) Emmanuel K. Gasana said that the Charter is an “additional step” in service excellence at all police levels.
He noted that police services to the public goes hand-in-hand with efforts to improve the efficiency, especially of police stations, which handle the most majority services needed by the people.
“We are going to embark on the campaign to sensitize people about this charter so that they know their rights and Police officers will also understand more on how best to efficiently and effectively serve the people,” said the IGP.
With the force being accountable to the public, the Police Chief observed that quality service contributes to fighting offenses like corruption and bribery in particular.
“RNP has come up with strategies to meet the expectations of the public through improved service delivery and accountability,” he noted.

According to the IGP, the Charter will be rolled out in all police stations across the country.

RNP and TI-Rwanda jointly came up with a Charter in a bid to clearly spell out what people should expect from the police. It spells out services offered by the police and gives members of the community a say through feedback.

In the charter, the police commits to providing an effective and efficient policing service to the public.

The IGP spoke at length about measures put in place by RNP in fighting graft, among them being the anti-corruption directorate under the department of Inspectorate of Services and Ethics, a disciplinary unit charged with taking varied actions against officers caught in such and other malpractices that are contrary to the norms and doctrines of the force; an anti-corruption and public embezzlement unit; ethics centre which further instill professional standards, values and norms among the police personnel and even to partners; internal audits, Rwanda Youth Volunteers in Community Policing, and established anti-crime clubs in schools and in communities.

The Chairperson of Transparency International Rwanda Chapter, Marie-Immaculee Ingabire spoke about their “good working relations” with RNP, unlike in other countries.

“Here in Rwanda, we relate very well with the police and this has reaped big; this service charter comes as additional seal to our partnership,” Ingabire said.

 She, however, added that TI’s efforts would be yield nothing if there was no political will.
 “Today, Rwanda is among the least corrupt countries in the world and this all due to political will and institutions like RNP that are willing to go to the limit in fighting corruption,” Ingabire said.
 “With this service charter, people will understand their rights to certain services and in return we will not register cases of corruption, which will place Rwanda further up among the least corrupt countries.”
 The event was also attended by different partners in policing and fighting corruption in particular.

Leave a Reply